April 20, 2014
"On a day like today, my master William Faulkner said, “I decline to accept the end of man.” I would fall unworthy of standing in this place that was his, if I were not fully aware that the colossal tragedy he refused to recognize thirty-two years ago is now, for the first time since the beginning of humanity, nothing more than a simple scientific possibility. Faced with this awesome reality that must have seemed a mere utopia through all of human time, we, the inventors of tales, who will believe anything, feel entitled to believe that it is not yet too late to engage in the creation of the opposite utopia. A new and sweeping utopia of life, where no one will be able to decide for others how they die, where love will prove true and happiness be possible, and where the races condemned to one hundred years of solitude will have, at last and forever, a second opportunity on earth."

— In the wake of Gabriel García Márquez’s death, wisdom from his 1982 Nobel Prize acceptance speech. Complement with Faulkner’s iconic 1950 Nobel speech on the role o the writer as a booster of the human heart, which Márquez bows to here. (via explore-blog)

April 18, 2014

Tell the king; the fair wrought house has fallen
No shelter has Apollo, nor sacred laurel leaves
The fountains are now silent; the voice is stilled.
It is finished.
— The final recorded words of the last Oracle of Delphi, 395 AD.

April 18, 2014

(Source: blog.thecurrent.org, via bitchboybible)

April 16, 2014

While the context and narrative itself sets up obstacles, the film often uses visuals to help express Clarice’s status in the order of things. A recurring visual motif is Clarice surrounded by taller men, dwarfed and brought down by their stature. Yes, Jodie Foster is a short woman, just a few inches over five feet, but the film often exaggerates that discrepancy to express her challenge in overcoming a patriarchal society that literally looks down on her. […]

The film camera also never objectifies Clarice. Throughout the film she is presented as an object of the male gaze by the characters in the narrative, but the camera does not assume this perspective of the male look until the end of the film. It’s at this point then that Clarice punishes and banishes the male gaze for objectifying her. [x]

(Source: kissthefuture, via pantyhouse)

April 16, 2014
"

The world is so big, so complicated, so replete with marvels and surprises that it takes years for most people to begin to notice that it is, also, irretrievably broken. We call this period of research “childhood.”

There follows a program of renewed inquiry, often involuntary, into the nature and effects of mortality, entropy, heartbreak, violence, failure, cowardice, duplicity, cruelty, and grief; the researcher learns their histories, and their bitter lessons, by heart. Along the way, he or she discovers that the world has been broken for as long as anyone can remember, and struggles to reconcile this fact with the ache of cosmic nostalgia that arises, from time to time, in the researcher’s heart: an intimation of vanished glory, of lost wholeness, a memory of the world unbroken. We call the moment at which this ache first arises “adolescence.” The feeling haunts people all their lives.

Everyone, sooner or later, gets a thorough schooling in brokenness.

"

— Michael Chabon, The Wes Anderson Collection (via brightwalldarkroom)

April 15, 2014

Island Of Lost Souls (1932)

attn: madunne

Island Of Lost Souls (1932)

attn: madunne

(Source: the-dark-city, via the-dark-city)

April 15, 2014

The Taste of Tea  (茶の味, Cha no Aji), 2004, dir. Katsuhito Ishii.

(Source: sopadepo, via tteaheehee)

April 15, 2014
"I can sympathize with Ken Kesey who once said that he stopped writing because he was tired of being a seismograph—an instrument that measures rumblings from a great distance. He said he wanted to be a lightning rod."

Tom Wolfe (via theparisreview)

April 13, 2014

margaretolson:

i think the best thing about don draper is his hatred of harry crane

(via amoebalanding)

April 9, 2014

(Source: donrickles, via k-troll)

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