January 7, 2014
thedissolve:


“Fargo’s relationship to the ‘real’ Minnesota has been central to the debate over the film ever since its 1996 release, especially its stylized take on the region’s Scandinavian roots, which comes out in names like Lundegaard and Gunderson, and dialogue sprinkled with lingual tics like ‘Oh, yah?’ and ‘Geez.’ There are moments observed with an absolute specificity of detail—the scraping of an iced-over car window as the ultimate in Midwest existential despair—and others that are cartoonish, even cruel, in laying out the banal rituals of buffet lines and needlepoint. Yet the Minnesota of Fargo reflects the Coens’ ambivalence about their home state rather than blanketing it strictly in contempt or affection; this is a place where decency and venality co-exist like anywhere else, and where the coded language can be authentically nice, as well as ‘Minnesota nice.’”

Our Movie Of The Week feature returns with the Coen brothers’ masterful Fargo, which Scott Tobias summarizes in five quotes in his kickoff Keynote essay. [Read more…]

thedissolve:

“Fargo’s relationship to the ‘real’ Minnesota has been central to the debate over the film ever since its 1996 release, especially its stylized take on the region’s Scandinavian roots, which comes out in names like Lundegaard and Gunderson, and dialogue sprinkled with lingual tics like ‘Oh, yah?’ and ‘Geez.’ There are moments observed with an absolute specificity of detail—the scraping of an iced-over car window as the ultimate in Midwest existential despair—and others that are cartoonish, even cruel, in laying out the banal rituals of buffet lines and needlepoint. Yet the Minnesota of Fargo reflects the Coens’ ambivalence about their home state rather than blanketing it strictly in contempt or affection; this is a place where decency and venality co-exist like anywhere else, and where the coded language can be authentically nice, as well as ‘Minnesota nice.’”

Our Movie Of The Week feature returns with the Coen brothers’ masterful Fargo, which Scott Tobias summarizes in five quotes in his kickoff Keynote essay. [Read more…]

December 14, 2013
my favorite movies.

I hate being put in the position to name my favorite movie almost as much as I hate ranking things in general, so this seems like a better way of “ranking” my favorite movies, even if there’s still a lot of overlap:

Movies that make me believe in love:

Lost in Translation (2003)

Sabrina (1954)

Annie Hall (1977)

Jackie Brown (1997)

Fargo (1996)

Movies that make me believe in evil (overlaps heavily with the following category):

No Country for Old Men (2007)

The Thin Blue Line (1988)

Ran (1985)

Dr. Strangelove (1964)

The Third Man (1949)

City of God (2002)

Movies that scare the bejesus out of me:

The House of the Devil (2009)

Blue Velvet (1986)

Alien (1979)

The Shining (1980)

Movies that make me believe in magic (overlaps heavily with the following category):

Beasts of the Southern Wild (2012)

Princess Mononoke (1997)

Pan’s Labyrinth (2006)

Stop Making Sense (1984)

Days of Heaven (1978)

Movies about youth, adulthood, nostalgia and family:

The 400 Blows (1959)

The Royal Tenenbaums (2001)

Rushmore (1998)

The Graduate (1967)

Submarine (2010)

Purely entertaining movies:

The Thing (1982)

Aliens (1986)

Die Hard (1988)

Commando (1985)

The Room (2003)

The Warriors (1979)

13 Assassins (2010)

Jaws (1975)

Heathers (1988)

The Taking of Pelham One Two Three (1974)

The Big Lebowski (1998)

Movies that appeal to the doomed Romantic in me (overlapping heavily with the next two categories):

Drive (2011)

Vertigo (1958)

Blade Runner (1982)

Children of Men (2006)

Chinatown (1974)

Portraits of madness and obsession:

Black Swan (2010)

Taxi Driver (1976)

Raging Bull (1980)

Martha Marcy May Marlene (2011)

The Conversation (1974)

The French Connection (1971)

Mulholland Dr. (2001)

Zodiac (2007)

The Vanishing (1988)

Studies of revenge and violence:

Unforgiven (1992)

Get Carter (1971)

Point Blank (1967)

Operas:

Once Upon a Time in the West (1968)

The Godfather (1972)

The Battle of Algiers (1966)

Double Indemnity (1944)

Touch of Evil (1958)

Trainspotting (1996)

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966)

Lawrence of Arabia (1962)

Swiss watch crime movies/mysteries with unforgettable dialogue:

The Big Sleep (1946)

Pulp Fiction (1994)

L.A. Confidential (1997)

Miller’s Crossing (1990)

Brick (2005)

Gosford Park (2001)

Movies that made me a better person for having watched them (strongly overlaps with all categories):

Hoop Dreams (1994)

Harlan County, USA (1976)

Winter’s Bone (2010) 

December 3, 2013

cinephilearchive:

The 160 Angriest Steps in Cinema History from the ever excellent Vashi Nedomansky.


POINT BLANK (1967) is a perfect revenge crime thriller set in Los Angeles. It can be argued that Lee Marvin’s portrayal of Walker is not that far removed from Schwarzenegger’s turn in THE TERMINATOR (1984). Both characters are single-minded in their quest and will stop at nothing to achieve their goal. In both films, there is a mechanical efficiency to how they approach their tasks. They both speak only when necessary… and even then it is an exercise in minimalism. Lee Marvin is a physical force as terrifying as Arnold… and this is clearly displayed as he takes “The 160 Angriest Steps in Cinema History” to begin his revenge on those who wronged him. Watch and listen as his unbroken, unstoppable momentum drives the story forward… —vashivisuals.com

Recommended reading, viewing, and listening:

(Source: cinephiliabeyond, via mattfractionblog)

October 15, 2013
lazymercenary:

"There’s a layout on ya, pictures and all."

lazymercenary:

"There’s a layout on ya, pictures and all."

(via mattfractionblog)

September 27, 2013

wehadfacesthen:

The Big Sleep (Howard Hawks, 1946)

(Source: bogartsbacall, via the-dark-city)

September 14, 2013

(Source: carygranted, via oldfilmsflicker)

August 15, 2013
“Hired by a bitch to find scum”

The PI’s bloodlines flow deeply into the tradition of masculine heroes. His characteristics loom so large over Western popular culture that it can be hard to make him out. This is the problem facing any book on the film noir detective: being a chap, in a movie, trying to solve a problem, he is as inscrutably general a cultural trope as the femme fatale. What makes a PI a PI, and not just some other kind of leading man? You can’t even really chalk him up to an era, since he has existed since the early days of film.

Essential reading for any fan (or potential fan) of hardboiled fiction.

(Source: the-feature)

July 23, 2013
nitratediva:

Raymond Chandler (July 23, 1888—March 26, 1959) makes his cameo in Double Indemnity, sitting outside Keyes’s office, reading a pulp novel.

The man.

nitratediva:

Raymond Chandler (July 23, 1888—March 26, 1959) makes his cameo in Double Indemnity, sitting outside Keyes’s office, reading a pulp novel.

The man.

(via filmnoirandfemmefatales)

June 8, 2013

The Night of the Hunter (1955)

(Source: haroldlloyds, via filmnoirandfemmefatales)

November 27, 2012

wednesdaydreams:

I never lose. Never really. 

Le Samouraï (1967)

I really, really want to see this. I can put it next to Taxi Driver, Get Carter, and Drive in my box of gritty movies about weird loners.

(via filmnoirandfemmefatales)

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