February 23, 2014

Let’s Talk About Movies:

ONE FOR EACH GENERATION
Anybody who drive cars for a living certainly has a story to tell.

The similarities between Taxi Driver (1976) and Drive (2011) are reflected in the characterization, the storyline, the shots and the ambiguous ending for both films. Some might argue which one is the best, but lets not compare them. Both Scorsese and Refn have created films that will last for generations to come. They also could not choose a better actor to play the lead. De Niro and Gosling both act as a loner who prone to violence and fall in love with women they can’t have. While Travis Bickle is one of De Niro’s most iconic role, Gosling has establish himself as one of Hollywood’s most popular leading man. 

(via oldfilmsflicker)

April 8, 2012

Watch the opening credits to Taxi Driver, and pay attention to Bernard Herrmann’s score.  It’s one of the finest examples of a leitmotif I can think of in film noir, juxtaposing the cool, bluesy beauty of the world Travis Bickle thinks he inhabits with the post-traumatic sturm und drang that really drives him.  It’s the central conflict of the movie, outlined in just two minutes.

These gifs show the same thoughtfulness in Scorsese’s direction.  Like these images—especially the one where the side mirror seems to melt—the movie constantly teeters on the line between fantasia and bitter reality.  In the end you’re left wondering, as with Lear, at how madness might be a kind of nightmare, or just a soothing dream.

(Source: papercaramel, via oldfilmsflicker)

December 19, 2011

Paul Schrader’s heavily marked-up outline for “Raging Bull” for which he shared writing credit with Mardik  Martin.
“It’s part of the oral tradition,” Mr. Schrader said of his process.  “Rather than writing my way through an outline, I tell my way through,  and then each time I tell it, I re-outline it.”
As the “Raging Bull” outline shows, Mr. Schrader had the thrust of  each scene, as well as key lines of dialogue (“If you win, you win. If  you lose, you still win.”) already worked out before he sat down to  write. (Alas, we couldn’t tell from this image how much of Jake La  Motta’s helpful description of how to cook a steak had been composed at  this stage.)
Mr. Schrader also gave an estimated page length for each scene as  well as a final count and a running tally of total pages, which he said  was crucial for pacing.
“It’s very important to calibrate these events and when they’re  happening,” he said. “Somebody says, ‘I don’t know why this scene  doesn’t work,’ and you say to them: ‘It’s very simple. It should have  happened 10 pages earlier. Then it would have worked.’”
The final shooting script for “Raging Bull” was “more or less” what was  submitted, Mr. Schrader said, though Mr. De Niro and the director Martin Scorsese  made further changes during filming. “The only way you could get a  final draft of that screenplay,” Mr. Schrader said, “would be to  transcribe it from the screen. As opposed to ‘Taxi Driver,’ which is  actually quite close to the script.”

Paul Schrader’s heavily marked-up outline for “Raging Bull” for which he shared writing credit with Mardik Martin.

“It’s part of the oral tradition,” Mr. Schrader said of his process. “Rather than writing my way through an outline, I tell my way through, and then each time I tell it, I re-outline it.”

As the “Raging Bull” outline shows, Mr. Schrader had the thrust of each scene, as well as key lines of dialogue (“If you win, you win. If you lose, you still win.”) already worked out before he sat down to write. (Alas, we couldn’t tell from this image how much of Jake La Motta’s helpful description of how to cook a steak had been composed at this stage.)

Mr. Schrader also gave an estimated page length for each scene as well as a final count and a running tally of total pages, which he said was crucial for pacing.

“It’s very important to calibrate these events and when they’re happening,” he said. “Somebody says, ‘I don’t know why this scene doesn’t work,’ and you say to them: ‘It’s very simple. It should have happened 10 pages earlier. Then it would have worked.’”

The final shooting script for “Raging Bull” was “more or less” what was submitted, Mr. Schrader said, though Mr. De Niro and the director Martin Scorsese made further changes during filming. “The only way you could get a final draft of that screenplay,” Mr. Schrader said, “would be to transcribe it from the screen. As opposed to ‘Taxi Driver,’ which is actually quite close to the script.”

(via directingfilm)

December 3, 2011

Martin Scorsese :  In Raging Bull, I guess the boxing scenes have a lot to do with the action sequences in my mind. All this editing and all this camera movement that I’d been exposed to for the past 25 years or 30 years came into play in those sequences, and Hitchcock had a lot to do with it, there’s no doubt, particularly in designing the scene where Sugar Ray Robinson, in the third bout that they have, when La Motta’s on the ropes, looks up at him, and Sugar Ray comes in for the kill. And there’s a kind of edited sequence of punishment that this character’s taking. I based it on, shot by shot, the shower scene of Psycho. And so I designed it correspondingly, in a way. The glove corresponds to a knife. And so, we shot it that way.

(Source: lawyerupasshole, via hitchcockandoldmovies)

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